MuSeq & Delta

It’s been a few weeks since I posted on this website, I’ve been working on the MuSeq updating and I’m pleased to say I’ve finally got it working, you can see this and previous videos on the Dove Audio YouTube Channel.

MuSeq USB updating

I’m finishing the beta unit build and I’m hopeful these will go to beta testers before the end of April. Then after a few weeks of testing the plan is to get the PCBs and panels on order, this will take about 6 weeks and then we can become shipping them to our dealers.

For those wondering what’s happening with the poly synth, Delta, It’s on hold whilst I’m at this critical stage with MuSeq, once the beta units are out and the orders have been placed, I can resume work on it.

So that’s pretty much it for this update, follow us on YouTube for more MuSeq videos and start badgering your preferred supplier to contact me about obtaining stock of the sequencer as soon as it’s available.

MuSeq pre-Production

Things are marching on with the MuSeq sequencer for the MU style modular synth. The pre-production PCB is assembled (couple of extra mod wires).

A few mod wires, but that’s why we test changes before going to production!

MuSeq has a number of modes and features, so I’ll explain them here;

  • 2 Channels of sequencing, A & B (channel A shown above)
  • Channel A has the following modes;
    • Note (1V oct but scaled to 12 notes)
    • Step Length (variable from 1/32 to 1/1 with triplets)
    • Gate triggers (1, 2 or 3) commonly called “ratchetting”
    • Gate On/Off
    • Legato
    • Skip
  • Channel B is linked to Channel A, but still has the following modes
    • Note or CV (512 value resolution)
    • Gate Triggers (1,2 or 3) same as channel A
    • Gate On/Off
    • Legato Mode
  • you can change the first step,
  • the last step
  • direction (forward, backward, pendulum, Fwd/bck and Random currently)
  • Syncable from MIDI or internal clock currently, will be adding Sync24, USB MIDI sync and also a pulse input from other modules in your system
  • Digital output (x2), one for Run/Stop and one for clock out (from 1 beat per bar down to 32 beats per bar)
  • Inputs (x2), can be used for Tempo, Channel A note, run stop, clock input, pattern change.
  • Bank play mode, this lets you chain up to 8 patterns together, with the added advantage that you can enable/disable patterns on the fly and set a number of repeats for each pattern. So you could have pattern 1 play 3 times, skip patterns 2 & 3 and then play pattern 4 once, then skip patterns 5,6,7 & 8 and go back to pattern 1.
  • Loading and saving of 8 banks of 8 patterns to an SD Card in text format, making it easy to share patterns.
  • USB updatable

There’s a way to go with the software but most of the features listed above are already in. I’m confident by the time the first production run arrives I’ll have got everything in.

One of the main goals for this was to make things smaller, I love sequencers, but loosing 8U of rack space to get 2 or 3 channels of fairly limited sequencing didn’t really appeal.
MuSeq is 3U wide and has two channels and of course you can get up to 64 steps per channel with variable gate lengths without sacrificing a channel to do that!

MuSeq panel layout.

I’ve endeavoured to keep the “analogue sequencer” feel as much as possible, but sometimes I think adding some digital into the mix makes for a truly powerful sequencer.

Below are a few images from the prototype showing the various “pages” which are selected by the knob just below the tempo knob.

More updates as they happen!

D501 – NJM2069

The last D501 NJM2069 VCFVCA modules has now shipped to the USA.
And as promised I wanted to share the schematics and PCB files (KiCAD format) with you.

You can download them here.

The NJM2069 is a fabulous sounding VCF/VCA and I really wish you could still buy these new. not only is a great VCF, but it has a VCA built in and a mixer. It’s a very simple chip to use as well requiring very little in the way of external components. If I could get a good supply of these it would make building poly-synths so much easier!

Anyway, on the PCB you’ll see I bought out the extra pre VCF inputs and the CVs for controlling the levels. Just keep in mind you *must* keep the CVs within -5V to +5V (though they operate from 0V to 5V), going outside of this will damage the chip.

I’ve also added a “Ko-fi” page, so if you feel like buying me a coffee (or in all honesty more likely some chocolate) then you can do so on my ko-fi page here.

Social Media

Some of you may have noticed that the Dove Audio facebook page has gone.
This doesn’t mean we’re gone, we’re still here, making synths and modules for synths.

What it does mean is that we’re no longer willing to support a platform that continues to allow hate speech, bigotry and mis-information (lies) and continually fails to do anything to remove such pages.

We believe the world would be a much better place without these things, and so we’ve decided to take a stand on that.

For the latest information, keep an eye on these pages, our Twitter account and YouTube channel.

Love to all

MuSeq Update

PCB routing all done and prototype PCBs have been ordered.

MuSeq PCB

We’re having parts fitted by the PCB supplier, though there will be a few we have to do by hand (for example, the through hole parts).

Couple of changes to the PCB;
1) It’s smaller so as to ensure it fits in both the Box11 and portable cabinet styles.
2) A rotary selector switch for the mode select (was previously a pot)
3) An extra switch to enable “bank play” mode (just below and to the right of the tempo knob
4) Moved the jack sockets up a little so there is the correct amount of space for the MIDI sockets.
5) An extra chip to allow updating via USB.
6) Offset and scale presets for both analogue CV outputs, so you can be sure you’ll get 1V/Oct regardless of any power supply problems.

The code base will be the same as before, so there should be minimal work to bring this board up.

The next steps will be assembling testing the first PCB when it arrives (early February) and then designing the new front panel (a few things have moved, so the holes will need to move accordingly) and then shipping to beta testers.

We’ll post a video once we have the prototype up and running.

MuSeq V1.1

Relaying the PCB for the next version of MuSeq is well underway.

3D render (some 3D shapes missing)

There are a few changes;
* gone is the extra display and rotary encoder as it really wasn’t useful.
* Added a switch for mode selection, just below tempo knob.
* allowed more space for the DIN connectors for MIDI/Sync24.
* shortened PCB so it actually fits in the case.
* a new way of updating in the field has been found.
* going to attempt to add USB MIDI in, this may or not be included in the final version. It’s very much dependant on what the impact is to the performance of the sequencer.

Rats Nest

Routing the PCB is going well, but it’s going to take a while to complete. My aim is to finish the PCB before the new year.

Dove Audio in 2021

I’m taking some time over the holidays to consider the future and direction of Dove-Audio. But a few things are certain, MuSeq will be resumed, and it’s going to need a new processor which means a lot of rework so will be a while before there are any real updates.

2020 has been a tough year for everyone, without exception. At Dove-Audio we’ve felt the impact, sadly sales this year, 2020, have slumped which means that I am probably going to need to do another Kickstarter to raise money for MuSeq, something I had hoped to avoid. It’s also going to have a knock on impact into the what we can develop, prototype and put into manufacture in 2021.

Delta, the poly synth, is going well at this stage but still has a long way to go. It is making sound and you can ‘play’ notes on it from a midi controller, but there is a way to go and there will need to be a revision of the analogue PCB.

Delta polysynth as it stands now, a jumble of dev kits and wires.

The design we did for Tangible Waves for a wavetable oscillator came out really well, with 7 wavetables and two oscillators (de-tuneable by up to an octave) it sounds better than we could have hoped for. We’re pleased to have been able to work with Robert on this and we’re looking at a Tangible Waves format WTF module.

For now, have a wonderful holiday and stay safe.

Paula

MuSeq update

Well things were going swimmingly and then I hit a problem.

Basically with the current software development (SDK) and tool chain I’m using there is no way to get “self programming” to work. Self programming is basically the bit that allows you to update in the field from an SDCard, USB, MIDI, etc.

To get around this I’d have to do one of the following;
– Swap to a new micro processor and new SDK and start from scratch (will take a lot of work, several months)

– Swap to a new SDK and port over the code and libraries I’m currently using (will take a month of two of work)

– Send out programmers to repair centers around the world to allow them to do updates (no extra time, but a lot of extra cost and annoyed customers).

None of the above are particularly appealing and I need to have a think about which way to go.

2020 has been a terrible year for Dove Audio sales wise, and I’m just about treading water financially, yes I do this as a hobby so don’t have salaries to worry about but I do have accountants bills, website bills and tax bills to pay.

These two things, and a number of personal issues I’m dealing with, have hit my mood very hard and I can feel myself dropping back into depression.

So, I’m going to be stopping for a while whilst I try and get some semblance of a “level playing field” back into my personal life and have a think about MuSeq.

Triggers

A few people noticed something odd to the left of my Q119 sequencer from synthesizers.com. This is my trigger expander, basically I wanted something that would let me trigger noise shots, or toggle end points on the sequencer.

Now, synthesizers.com very kindly put a header on the back of the Q119 which brings out the key signals you need to do this, so adding an external trigger module was simply a case of reverse engineering the pin out and making a PCB.

D119 trigger PCB
D119 trigger PCB

This shows the PCB, and what I wanted to accomplish was that this was something people could make themselves rather than something I was going to sell. Why? well a number of reasons, I don’t honestly believe many people would be interested in buying and also the cost of the switches would make it quite an expensive module to sell, for what it does.

So I made it through hole, this was a huge pain in the butt, routing PCBs with surface mount parts is so much easier because you can run tracks under pads, with through hole, every track has to go between the holes. Add to this the fact I wanted to keep it 1U wide.

This PCB ended up being 4 layers, but is still quite cheap (4 layer PCBs from china only cost a couple of dollars more than 2 layer versions).

  • Rear of D119 PCB
  • D119 trigger PCB

You’ll need to be careful about the order in which you solder parts on, I’d suggest that the second to last is the switches and the final parts are the LEDs (so you can position them at the correct height.
You’ll also need to solder ground and output wires to the three connectors which are not mounted on the PCB.

In the ZIP file of the project I’ve included the schematics, gerbers and KiCAD files you need so you can make your own, or tweak the design as you see fit.

If I was to make these again, I would pretty much certainly make it surface mount to make it easier to route and this would make it cheaper to manufacture in quantity.

MuSeq Update

Another quick update for MuSeq, This time I’ve added the ability to set the “clock out” rate, so you can go from 1 clock per 4 beats all the way to 32 clocks per 4 beats. A short video is below

MuSeq Clock out demo

There are a few things left to do, so here’s a list;

  • Clock in from front panel (feed it say 8 clocks and get 24 PPQN resolution)
  • Self updating, i.e. you can update from SDCard
  • MIDI out
  • Sync 24 Out
  • Some internal tidying up of sequence loading/saving, particularly when in Bank play mode.
  • Redesign of PCB and Front Panel

The big hurdle is going to be the self updating, it always is. As it essentially requires you to boot into a bit of code to check for updates, then clear itself and load the main code, add in the ability to make it so you can’t brick it and things become quite difficult quite quickly.

The remainder should be straight forward, then it’s a case of getting prices and looking for a couple of beta testers before it can be shipped.